Cost to Repair a Fence – 2019 Average Prices

Wooden fence in need of repair

2019 Fence Repair Costs

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National Average Price $550
Minimum Price $50
Maximum Price $2,500


As Robert Frost reported, “Good fences make good neighbors.” A good fence also establishes property lines. It can keep out prying eyes and dampen noise levels from your pool, backyard barbecue, or family gathering.

But, how much does it cost to repair broken fences? The cost to repair a fence will depend on the type of fencing, whether your homeowner’s insurance will cover part of the expense, if it is a shared fence, what needs repair, and labor.

However, the average cost to repair a fence is $550. That price could range between $50 for a DIY fix or nearly $2,500 to hire a professional to repair a large section of wood or vinyl fence.

Although wooden fences look rustic and robust, when these fences get broken, the fix can be expensive. Plus, replacing a few boards on a fence sticks out. Therefore, you might need to repaint or stain and varnish the entire fence, which can be costly.

Painting or staining a fence could cost $2,000, but the price varies by the size of the fence. Also, bear in mind that something as simple as the color choice can make a significant difference in the expense. Painting a dark fence white will likely take two or three coats.

Another option many consider is installing a new fence to replace the old one. A new chain-link fence to replace the old wood fence will typically cost $5 – $15 per linear foot. Whereas, the wooden fence could be twice that.

Try our fence material calculator to plan out your project and materials if you’re considering replacement.

Cost Considerations

Three essential factors will affect how much your fence repair will cost, height, length, and material.

  • Height: Fences are usually 4, 5, or 6 feet tall. The taller the fence, the more material you need to repair it. Variations from the norm, such as a four-foot, six-inch fence will probably require buying a five-foot section and cutting it down.
  • Length: How many feet of the fence got damaged will determine how much you pay. However, it might cost less to replace a complete section of fence than to repair a small portion.
  • Material: The fence construction material will determine how much new supplies and materials will cost.

Types of Fence & Repairs

The type of material used generally determines what went wrong and what repairs are necessary. Sections or panels are usually kept in stock at home improvement centers, and quite often cost less than what you would pay for the materials to DIY.

Wooden Fence

High winds can knock over a tall privacy fence. Usually, when this happens, you can replace the section that got knocked down, but you might need to replace a post or two. Replacing a post costs about $150 – $300. Straightening a post or section of fence will cost about $100 to $150 for labor only.

Rotten or mold-infested boards on the fence might require replacement of a section; which might be more cost-effective. Expect to pay $15 – $25 per linear foot to replace a part of wooden fence. That works out to $180 – $300 for a twelve-foot section of fence, plus $100 – $150 per post.

These costs reflect the costs of pressure-treated cedar. Other woods will cost more or less depending on the market prices per board-foot. Pine usually is cheapest at $3 to $6 per board foot, while white oak could cost $60 per board foot.

Lattice

Lattice section replacements cost about $21 – $44 per linear foot because more materials are necessary to make a section. Therefore, replacing a 12-foot section costs $250 – $500.

Vinyl or PVC

Usually, the same problems with wooden fences also happens with vinyl privacy fences; though the replacement materials are more expensive for vinyl.

Vinyl or PVC fence sections and posts are frequently more costly than wood but are nearly maintenance-free. Expect to pay $25 – $35 per linear foot for replacement sections. In most cases with vinyl fences, you must replace an entire section or panel.

Chain-link fences are usually the cheapest to install and repair. Likewise, they seldom need repairs because the wind blows right through. Typical repairs are due to damage caused by vehicles. Straightening a post could cost $50 – $100. Replacing a gate, $125 to $300.

Stone/Rock or Concrete/Mortar

Fixing a stone or rock wall usually only entails labor because the rocks can get reused. Concrete and mortar fences usually require more concrete mix or mortar to repair cracks and holes, plus you might need to add paint.

Most of the cost to repair these types of fences is labor, so whatever the local market price per person-hour, plus supplies, is what you should pay for repairs. However, most general contractors and even handyperson have a minimum service call fee.

Expect repairs to start at $100, and up to $300, depending on the size of the repair needed.

Other Considerations

Before you start repairs, contact either the homeowner’s association (HOA), building inspector’s office, or both. Many HOAs have rules and limitations to what repairs or replacements can get completed. If everyone in the HOA has a six-foot wooden privacy fence, changing the fence might not be an option.

Different states and municipalities regulate property division. Many states require all property owners to share the cost of fence repairs equally. However, getting it done and presenting the bill to a neighbor will likely cause problems.

Also, if you back into the fence adjoining another’s property, do not expect your neighbor to share the cost of repairs. Although, your auto or homeowner’s insurance might cover some of the cost.

It would be best if you spoke with your homeowner’s insurance company, each neighbor, the building inspector, and tax assessor before contracting repairs. Most municipalities do not require a permit for repairs. If they do it usually adds $20 to $100 to your costs.

Get free fence repair estimates from installers in your area and compare the work they will do to the quoted price and the information above.

All pricing information on this page is based on average industry costs, and is subject to variance for project-specific materials, labor rates, and requirements.